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Kindergarten - Core Curriculum

Reading

Our kindergarten language arts curriculum develops students as readers through:

  • High frequency word recognition practice

  • Phonics skills

  • Comprehension skills

  • Fluency

Reading and spelling inventories are administered three times per year to determine each student’s needs and to assess their progress.

Students rotate through reading centers 4 days per week including:

  • The Listening Center – students scan a QR code to listen to a story on their iPad, after which they complete a comprehension assignment

  • Read To Self Center – independent reading

  • Word Work Center – students meet with a teacher weekly to practice the phonics and spelling skill of the week.

  • Writing Center – students have the choice of writing lists, cards, and working on narrative stories.

Phonics skills include:

  • Short vowels

  • Long vowels

  • Vowel teams

  • Digraphs

  • Diphthongs

  • R controlled vowels

Writing

In our Writer’s Workshop:

  • Students will learn beginning phases of the writing process through development of their personal narratives.

  • Students will plan, sketch, write, edit, and add details to their work.

  • Students will learn to write stories using phonetic spelling, with a clear beginning, middle, and end.

  • Students will learn “How To” writing during where students teach readers how to do something through their writing using “first, next, then, and last.”

  • Students will learn Persuasive Writing where they will write their opinions and provide support for their opinions.

  • Teachers confer with students one on one to establish and work on writing goals.

Our kindergarten mathematics curriculum exposes students to a wide range of skills with a heavy focus on numeracy and understanding the meaning and relationship between numbers.  Daily manipulatives are used for concrete practice.

  • Students will learn to count to 100 by ones, twos, fives, and tens.

  • Students will learn to compare and order numbers within 100.

  • Students will learn to compose and decompose teen numbers.

  • Students will learn to add and subtract fluently within 10.

  • Students will apply knowledge of addition and subtraction to complete word problems within 20.

  • Students will understand the relationship between numbers and quantities, and will connect counting to cardinality.

  • Students will learn to attend to precision when counting sets and recording answers.

  • Students will learn to use the ten frame to visualize numbers in preparation for working with larger numbers.

  • Students will learn that numbers are composed of “tens”and “ones” as we build a foundation for place value knowledge.

  • Students will learn measurement, coin identification, and value.

  • Students will practice skills that they are learning by playing cooperative games such as Roll and Record, Shake and Spill, and Candy Land Tens & Ones.

  • Students will develop an imaginary farm as an introduction to Project Based Learning (PBL).

  • Students will work weekly with a teacher and peers to respond to story problems which will result in the creation of a foldable farm.  This project extends learning of counting, base ten, adding/subtracting, measurement, and shapes.

Kindergarten Social Studies curriculum is integrated into other subjects, especially Computer Science and Language Arts. The focus of kindergarten Social Studies is  communities and community helpers.

  • Students will design and represent their own community using objects in our classroom and “buildings in the community,” created by them. Students learn to code roads for the Ozobots to drive around in, representing cars in their community.

  • Students will learn the difference between the past, present, and future.

  • Students will learn about the First Thanksgiving and the life of pilgrim children.

  • Students will compare and contrast their day to a typical day in the life of pilgrim children.

  • Students will learn how to set a resolution for themselves.

  • Students will learn about important people in history such as Martin Luther King Jr., Ruby Bridges, and Betsy Ross.

  • Students will learn about maps and locations, gaining perspective on distance and location while learning about cities, states, countries, and continents in our “Me on the Map” unit.

  • Students will communicate with their digital penpals in Dubai using the Flipgrid app, and will share the state and country they are from.

  • Students will learn vocabulary related to past, present, and future, collaboratively creating a timeline of their year in kindergarten, as well as a timeline of their lives.

Kindergarten scientists learn through questioning, exploring, doing, and utilizing their natural curiosity.

  • Students will actively conduct investigations, share ideas with peers, and record data in their science journals.

  • Students will learn about science tools and the science journal.

  • Students will learn to accurately record their assignments and findings in the journal.

  • Students will explore daily with science tools and materials (such as magnifying lenses, construction materials, and magnets).

Units covered in science include:

  • Life Cycles

  • Plants and Animals

  • Weather

  • Engineering and Design

  • Magnetism

  • Forces and Motion

  • Properties of Matter

The Greene School Foreign Language program is intended to develop listening comprehension and verbal skills in young children with classes three times a week.  Skills in speaking, listening, reading, and writing are developed in this course. Students acquire language proficiency with visual and interactive support using grade level vocabulary and techniques such as Total Physical Response (TPR) and Natural Approach.  The goal of both of these strategies is to allow students to learn a second language in the same way they learned their first language – through their senses, encouraging long-term retention of the language.

Kindergarten students use the ¡Qué chévere! and Realidades curriculum textbook which integrate development of language proficiency into cultural understanding using project-based learning activities, multimedia resources, role-play skits, songs, games, and stories.

  • Students will learn basic topics and frequently used expressions.

  • Students will learn subject pronouns, verb agreement, people, verbs, objects, places, foods, and prepositions.

  • Students will learn to provide basic information about themselves using words, phrases, and memorized expressions.

  • Students will learn to ask basic questions of daily life using complete sentences.

  • Students will be able to express likes and dislikes.

  • Students will learn to communicate with a partner in directed or free-response dialogues, practice structure, and games.

  • Students will learn to pre-write by drawing pictures to support ideas related to a task.

  • Students will learn basic practices and perspectives of cultures where the target language is spoken (such as greetings, holiday celebrations, etc.)

  • Students will learn to compare words in the target language to those in his/her own language.

  • Students will learn to recite the numbers from 1-20 in the target language.

First Grade - Core Curriculum

Our language arts curriculum utilizes a balanced approach to literacy including interactive read alouds, guided reading, shared reading, independent daily reading, and word study.

Reading

Teachers assess each child to determine their instructional reading level throughout the year, and meet with students one-on-one and in small groups to differentiate instruction and ensure the success of every student. Students are exposed to different genres of literature, fiction, non-fiction, and poetry.

Students will learn decoding, making connections within the text, predicting, visualizing, activating their prior knowledge, re-telling, summarizing, evaluating, inferring, and reading comprehension.

  • Students will learn to identify the main idea, explain the problem and solution in their own words, sequence major details or key events in a story, and compare and contrast characters and story elements.

Writing

First grade students focus on three major genres of writing throughout the year – Narrative, Informational, and Opinion Writing.

  • Students will learn to write small-moment stories with a true beginning, middle, and end.

  • Students will be able to recount two or more appropriately sequenced events including details from the story using temporal words to signal event word order, such as first, next, then, and last.

  • In our Informational unit, students will research a topic and use their research to write about various topics.

  • In the Opinion unit, students will write about a topic they are interested in and supply details as to why they feel a certain way.

  • Throughout the year, the students work on sentence structure.

  • Students will learn capitalization and punctuation using nouns, adjectives, and verbs.

  • Students will learn correct usage of present, past, and future tense verbs and contractions.

  • Students will be introduced to commas, common, proper and possessive nouns, and appropriate punctuation.

Handwriting

  • Students will continue improving handwriting with our handwriting program, Zaner-Bloser.

  • Students will learn beginning typing skills.

In first grade, we differentiate our math skills based on need and ability. Students work in small cooperative groups and learn to utilize different manipulatives and strategies to become confident and knowledgeable in their math skills. Students use hundred boards, number lines, white boards, base-ten blocks, and various counters and number cards to help them develop their math foundation.

We utilize the Pearson Envision math textbook for our math skills and we diversify our instructional strategies. Our strategies include (but are not limited to) problem-based learning, embedded visual learning, and personalization to empower every student.

  • Students will learn to add and subtract fluently to 100.

  • Students will learn to create their own bar graph, line graph, and pictograph, and analyze the data collected.

  • Students will learn place value to the thousands.

  • Students will learn to compare two, three, and four digit numbers.

  • Students use these skills to sequence numbers and compare numbers to determine if they are greater than, less than, or equal to.

  • Students will learn to solve word problems using the key vocabulary words that are regularly found in mathematical word problems.

  • Students will learn word problem strategies such as circling the key numbers in the problem, drawing a representational picture, writing a number sentence, and labeling the answer with the correct unit from a problem.

  • Students will learn to use models and strategies to add and subtract fluently within the ones place, tens place, and hundreds place.

  • Students will learn to measure and compare objects with non-standard and standard units.

  • Students will learn how to tell time on an analog and digital clock to the hour, half hour, and minute.

  • Students will learn the strategy of counting by 5’s on the clock.

  • Students will compare and contrast two-dimensional and three-dimensional shapes, and identify fractions to the whole, half, third, and fourth.

  • Students will learn regrouping the tens place and the hundreds place.

  • Students will focus on their problem solving process and learn how to explain their thought process through “math talk” to their peers.

The purpose of our social studies program is to build a strong classroom community and to expand the children’s interest in their world. Students will learn to take responsibility for their own actions and develop a respect for themselves, each other, and their environment. Topics taught in first grade include:

  • The Importance of Rules

  • All About Me

  • Continents and Oceans

  • The United States of America

  • The History of Thanksgiving

  • Holidays Around the World

  • Martin Luther King, Jr.

  • The United States Presidents and Famous Monuments

  • The Life of  Dr. Seuss.

Activities include creating projects and presentations that illustrate students’ grasp of social studies concepts.  Students will participate in Read Across America using Dr. Seuss classics. Students will learn to work collaboratively in cooperative groups. Our students learn how to work together and have their voices and opinions heard in a positive manner.

Greene School students learn to research, compare and contrast, problem solve, and persevere throughout our thematic units of study.  Students learn to work collaboratively with their peers and are encouraged to ask questions and research their answers. Field experiences to the Palm Beach Zoo and the South Florida Science Museum are provided and expert guest speakers support the class curriculum.

During our Human Body and Anatomy unit:

  • Students will learn about major organs, as well as the various systems that the organs are located in.

  • Students will learn the importance of each organ, nutrition, and how each system works together to help keep our body healthy.

  • Students will research, write, and present specific body parts to the class.

  • Students will complete a model of the human body.

In our Solar System unit:

  • Students will learn about the various planets, and their location in space, the moon, and how humans successfully visit space.

  • Students choose an area of interest to research further and present to the class.

In our Animal Classifications and Habitats unit:

  • Students will learn the six different animal groups, and the various characteristics that make up each animal classification.

  • Students will learn the habitats, and environmental needs of various animals.

  • Students will compare and contrast animals to humans.

The Dinosaur Era unit:

  • Students will research and learn about the dinosaurs that once roamed our Earth.

  • Students will learn about omnivores, herbivores, and carnivores, as well as why and how dinosaurs became extinct.

  • Students will create a powerpoint of their chosen dinosaur, as well as a diorama depicting a scene of their dinosaur in its environment.

The Greene School Foreign Language program is intended to develop listening comprehension and verbal skills in young children with classes three times a week.  Skills in speaking, listening, reading and writing are developed in this course. Students acquire language proficiency with visual and interactive support using grade level vocabulary and techniques such as Total Physical Response (TPR) and Natural Approach.  The goal of both of these strategies is to allow students to learn a second language in the same way they learned their first language – through their senses, encouraging long-term retention of the language.

First grade students use the ¡Qué chévere! and Realidades curriculum textbook which integrate development of language proficiency into cultural understanding using project-based learning activities, multimedia resources, songs, games, and stories.

  • Students will learn familiar topics and frequently used expressions.

  • Students will participate in short conversations in familiar contexts.

  • Students will learn to follow directions or instructions to complete a task when expressed in short conversations.

  • Students will engage in short social interactions using phrases and simple sentences.

  • Students will use basic language skills supported by body language and gestures to express agreement and disagreement.

  • Students will describe aspects of daily life using phrases and complete sentences.

  • Students will recognize basic practices and perspectives of cultures where the target language is spoken (such as greetings, holiday celebrations, etc.).

  • Students will demonstrate basic knowledge acquired in the target language in order to compare words that are similar to those in his/her own language.

  • Students will learn how to use information acquired through the study of the practices and perspectives of the target culture(s) to identify elements of their characteristics and compare them to own culture.

  • Students will demonstrate and understanding of key points on familiar topics presented through a variety of media.

  • Students will learn to recite the numbers from 1-30 in the target language.

Second Grade - Core Curriculum

Our language arts curriculum utilizes a balanced approach to literacy including interactive read alouds, guided reading, shared reading, independent daily reading, and word study.

Reading

Second grade is a pivotal year for students as the focus moves from learning to read toward reading to learn.  Instruction focuses on multiple intelligences and various learning styles present among students. Students will be reading for knowledge across all subject areas. Autonomy is the main objective. Students are encouraged to become independent, self-reliant learners as they explore multiple genres and expand their reading repertoire.

Reading skills include demonstrating an independent interest in reading-related activities, and listening with interest and purpose to stories and other texts read aloud.

  • Students will learn to listen to mentor texts that model reading strategies.

  • Students will learn to construct meaning from print and interpret stories and short passages.

  • Students will learn to decode new words by using phonics and/or contextual clues.

  • Students will learn to demonstrate an understanding of stories by identifying the main idea and main characters, placing events in sequence, and predicting the outcome.

  • Students will learn to summarize stories.

  • Students will learn to identify the difference between fact and opinion.

  • Students will learn to respond to who, what, when, where, how and why questions and include the same thoroughness in their story writing.

  • Students will learn to identify the main idea and details of a story, including retelling a reading selection.

Writing

Writing is incorporated through a cross-curricular approach.  Students are encouraged to focus on the writing process. Focus is based on content and quality over quantity.

  • Students will learn the value of the editing process and how to use editing symbols.

  • Students learn to conduct research and use the information to write detailed stories.

  • Students will learn to utilize a myriad of graphic organizers to generate ideas, show their thinking, and establish a reference point for writing.

  • Students will learn to write a clear topic sentence, focusing on the main idea and including details that elaborate on the main idea.

  • Students will learn to use transition words for sentence variety.

Writing activities include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • Students will use a writing folder to organize writing assignments and to keep track of the stages of writing.

  • Students will write friendly letters, research papers, realistic fiction stories, written responses to reading, persuasive essays, and narrative essays.

  • Students will complete a five-paragraph narrative story.

  • Students will write poetry (including bio poems, haiku, triante and acrostic style).

  • Students will write regular reflections in a journal.

  • Students will develop public speaking skills by presenting many writing assignments to groups.

Grammar and Vocabulary

Grammar and vocabulary will be taught in application. Grammar will be a focus during the editing phase of the writing process.  Parts of speech and figurative language are highlighted and practiced throughout ELA class through the use of mentor texts and independent practice.  Vocabulary for each subject is reviewed in context. Novel study provides a foundation for vocabulary acquisition and usage.

Handwriting

Cursive handwriting is introduced and practiced regularly.  Students continue to use and practice manuscript handwriting.  Students practice reading cursive writing and are prepared to write short stories in cursive by the end of the school year.

Our mathematics curriculum uses Pearson Envision math textbook and is supplemented with various project-based activities where students are encouraged to collaborate and work through real-life problems. The overall focus of mathematics in second grade is to promote number sense and problem-solving skills to allow students to work through problems that require multiple steps.

Students work through the following concept areas: Operations and Algebraic Thinking, Number and Operations in Base 10, Measurement and Data, and Geometry.

Within each area, students make real-world connections through word problems. While we differentiate within these concept areas for each student’s individual needs and skill set, all necessary benchmark milestones are covered.  Students will learn to:

Operations in Algebraic Thinking 

  • Use addition and subtraction within 1,000 to solve and two-step word problems.

  • Fluently add and subtract within 20 using mental strategies.

  • Determine whether a group of objects (up to 20) has an even or odd number of members. Use skip counting by 2 as a strategy.

  • Use addition to find the total number of objects arranged in rectangular arrays with up to 5 rows and 5 columns; write an equation to match the array.

  • Interpret products of whole numbers; understand that 5 x 7 is 5 groups of 7 objects.

Number and Operations in Base 10

  • Understand that the three digits of a three-digit number represent hundreds, tens, and ones.

  • Count within 1000; skip count by 5s, 10s, and 100s.

  • Read and write numbers to 1000 using base-ten numerals, number names, and expanded form.

  • Compare numbers using <,>, and =.

  • Fluently add and subtract within 1,000 using strategies based on place value, properties of operations, and/or the relationship between addition and subtraction.

  • Mentally add 10 or 100 more to a given number within 1,000.

  • Understand a fraction as the quantity formed by 1 part when a whole is partitioned into equal parts.

Measurement and Data

  • Measure the length of an object by selecting and using appropriate tools, such as rulers, yard/meter sticks, and measuring tape.

  • Estimate lengths using units of inches, feet, centimeters, and meters.

  • Measure to determine how much longer one object is than another.

  • Tell and write time from analog and digital clocks to nearest 5 minutes, using a.m. and p.m.

  • Solve word problems involving dollar bills, quarters, dimes, nickels, and pennies, using $ and ¢.

  • Draw a picture graph and a bar graph (with single-unit scale) to represent a data set with up to four categories. Solve simple one to two-step word problems and compare the information presented in the graph.

Geometry 

  • Recognize and draw shapes having specified attributes, such as a given number of angles or a given number of equal faces.  Identify triangles, quadrilaterals, pentagons, hexagons, and cubes.

  • Partition a rectangle into rows and columns of the same size square and find the total.

  • Partition circles and rectangles into two, three, or four equal shares, describe the shares using words halves, thirds, half of, a third of, etc. and describe the whole as two halves, three thirds, four fourths.  Recognize that equal shares of identical wholes need not have the same shape.

Examples of project-based activities include:

  • Creating a Gold Rush Mining Camp Map demonstrating an understanding of geometric shapes, area, and perimeter. (Cross-curricular with Social Studies and Language Arts).

  • Planning a Halloween party on a budget. Students must plan accordingly for the number of people that they plan to invite.

Our second grade social studies curriculum builds on the foundation created in first grade. Units are integrated into other subjects and based around current events (such as holidays and current themes).  Student learning is based on questions, goals, understanding, and evidence, a learning plan is established using project-based learning that often employs technology.

  • Students will learn geography and map decoding skills.

  • Students will learn to describe the absolute and relative locations of people, places and environments.

  • Students will learn about the world around them through weekly current events activities and research.

  • Students will examine places and regions and the connections among them.

  • Students will learn to describe governmental institutions and practices in the United States and other countries.

  • Students will learn to compare and contrast everyday life in different times and places around the world and recognize that some aspects of people, places and things change over time while others stay the same.

Students will participate in project-based-learning activities such as (but not limited to):

  • Constructing questions about a topic, identify resources, and collect and organize information about the topic into a short report.

  • Designing and presenting projects on a selected country with special attention to the allocation of scarce resources in societies through analysis of individual choice, market interaction and public policy.

Students will be exposed to examples for each category: Earth Science, Life Science, and Physical Science,

  • Students will learn to discover the world around them as they test predictions through creative thinking.

  • Students will learn to explore energy changes through motion and movement, energy in the form of sound and light, the significant impact of water and climate, the roles of plants and animals in their environment, and the structure of life in an ecosystem.

  • Students will learn how energy can be changed through motion and movement.  Students will learn to recognize forces at work.

  • Students will understand the roles that plants and animals play in their environment and they will recognize the structures of life.

The Greene School Foreign Language program is intended to develop listening comprehension and verbal skills in young children with classes three times a week.  Skills in speaking, listening, reading, and writing are developed in this course. Students acquire language proficiency with visual and interactive support using grade level vocabulary and techniques such as Total Physical Response (TPR) and Natural Approach.  The goal of both of these strategies is to allow students to learn a second language in the same way they learned their first language – through their senses, encouraging long-term retention of the language.

Second grade students use the ¡Qué chévere! and Realidades curriculum textbook which integrate development of language proficiency into cultural understanding using project-based learning activities, multimedia resources, songs, games, and stories.

  • Students will learn recalling, interpreting, and pronouncing the vocabulary appropriately.

  • Students will learn grade level subject pronouns, subject-verb agreement, adjectives, adverbs, people, verbs, clothes, objects/other nouns, places, sports/entertainment/music, foods, prepositions, time/days of the week, and colors.

  • Students will converse in short conversations, in familiar contexts.

  • Students will converse using short, simple messages and announcements on familiar topics.

  • Students will learn to translate simple stories or narratives.

  • Students will learn to follow short and simple directions.

  • Students will learn to recite the numbers from 1-40 in the target language.

Third Grade - Core Curriculum

Our language arts curriculum utilizes a balanced approach to literacy including reading, writing, and vocabulary study. Students will think, talk, and write about what they read in a variety of articles, books, and other texts including history, social studies, and science. In collaborative discussions, students will build on the ideas of others by listening, asking questions, and sharing ideas. Students will gather information from books, articles, and online sources to build understanding of a topic. They will write research and opinion papers over extended periods of time. Students will pay more attention to organizing information, developing ideas, and supporting these ideas with facts, details, and reasons in their writing.

Reading

Students will learn the components of literature through novel studies, both fictional and informational, and poetry analysis.

Throughout our fictional novel units:

  • Students will learn to determine the cause and effect of situations, identify problems and resolutions within the plot, understand sequencing within the context of summarizing literary texts, and establish the central idea with suitable titles for chapters within the novels.

  • Students will learn to make inferences, draw conclusions, and make predictions regarding the plot, characters, and settings by identifying details.

  • Students will learn characterization through analysis of dialogue, comparing and contrasting characters, describing character traits and attributes, explaining character motivation, inferring character feelings, determining how characters develop or change over time, and analyzing how settings affect characters.

  • Students will learn how to search for the author’s hidden messages and develop a deeper understanding while examining central symbols and themes.

  • Students will learn elements of the author’s craft by examining mood and the narrator’s tone, the usage of figurative language, how the author appeals to the reader’s senses, and how the author develops their characters.

  • Students will learn to summarize a sequence of events across multiple chapters. This includes identifying the main idea, supporting details, and various conflicts within the text with correlating solutions.

  • Students will learn to identify details that support inferences and predictions, identifying various points of view, and utilizing context clues and visualization with the purpose of enhancing comprehension.

  • Students will learn to identify the author’s tone, how the author establishes various moods and why, what certain figurative elements indicate throughout the story, and how the author uses components such as foreshadowing and flashbacks to enhance the reader’s experience while strengthening the storyline.

  • Students will learn to ask open-ended questions, determine the climax, and compare all novels read throughout the year.

Throughout our informational novel units:

  • Students will learn to distinguish facts from opinions.

  • Students will learn to determine the effects of events within the text.

  • Students will learn to identify evidence to support claims.

  • Students will learn to draw conclusions based on inferences from the information.

  • Students will learn to outline important events.

  • Students will learn to identify the main idea, and distinguish details that support the main idea in informational text through the skill of note-taking.

Throughout our poetry units:

  • Students will learn various elements of poetry such as a poem’s structure, lines, stanzas, rhyme scheme, rhythm, end and internal repetition, imagery, figurative language, sensory details, mood, and tone.

  • Students will learn to use their creative ability and planning skills to compose original, descriptive poems, narrative poems, and simile poems.

  • Students will learn to analyze poetry and determine the author’s purpose, tone, mood, and hidden message, along with inferring assumptions about the author based on their poetry.

Vocabulary

Third graders will analyze select vocabulary words from their novels and expand their knowledge of Greek and Latin root words to strengthen their vocabulary acquisition and usage.

  • Students will learn to identify the correct definition and/or confirm initial understanding of multiple-meaning words with the use of dictionaries and context clues.

  • Students will learn to analyze and apply their knowledge of Greek and Latin affixes as clues to determine the meanings of Greek, and Latin words.

  • Students will learn to employ context to determine the meaning of words in informational and literary texts, implement definitions of roots to determine word meaning or meanings of Latin and Greek roots, and utilize dictionary definitions to confirm initial understanding of words or determine the meaning of unfamiliar words.

Writing & Grammar

Sentence and paragraph structure are a primary focus in third grade writing.

  • Students will learn to elaborate their sentences by incorporating description and infusing context clues in conjunction with vocabulary words.

  • Students will learn to write three types of writing: Persuasive Writing, Friendly Letter Writing, and Narrative Writing.

  • Students will learn to compose an argument using a hook sentence, three strong evidences from the text supporting their opinion, and a conclusion sentence.

  • Students will learn how to compose a friendly letter with the proper heading, greeting, body, and closing, as well as how to format street addresses when addressing envelopes.

  • Students will create and publish personal narratives using graphic organizers for planning.

  • Students will learn to write a persuasive essay using a catchy hook in their introduction, citing at least three details from the text as supportive evidence, and determining a convincing conclusion.

  • Students will learn to research and compose a research report.

  • Students will learn to use prior knowledge of friendly letter writing to draft, edit, and publish realistic fiction postcards, writing from a person in history.

  • Students will learn to plan and compose five paragraph narrative essays.

  • Students will incorporate their prior knowledge of letter writing and persuasive writing to persuade a character from one of our novels.

  • Students will learn proper grammar usage with practice editing and revising sentences, and identifying and correcting various parts of speech.

Our mathematics curriculum uses Pearson Envision math textbook and is supplemented with various project-based activities where students are encouraged to collaborate and work through real-life problems. The overall focus of mathematics in third grade is multiplication and division within 100, fractions, especially unit fractions, rectangular arrays and area, and analyzing two-dimensional shapes.

Students work through the following concept areas: Operations and Algebraic Thinking, Number and Operations in Base 10, Measurement and Data, and Geometry.

Within each area, students make real-world connections through word problems. While we differentiate within these concept areas for each student’s individual needs and skill set, all necessary benchmark milestones are covered.  Assessed skills include:

Operations in Algebraic Thinking 

  • Students will learn to represent and solve problems involving multiplication and division.

  • Students will learn properties of multiplication and the relationship between multiplication and division.

  • Students will learn to multiply and divide within 100.

  • Students will learn to solve problems involving the four operations, and identify and explain patterns in arithmetic.

Number and Operations

  • Students will learn to use place value understanding and properties of operations to perform multi-digit arithmetic.

  • Students will develop an understanding of fractions as numbers.

Measurement and Data

  • Students will learn to solve problems involving measurement and estimation of intervals of time, liquid volumes, and masses of objects.

  • Students will learn to represent and interpret data.

  • Students will understand concepts of area, and relate area to multiplication and addition in geometric measurement.

  • Students will learn to recognize perimeter as an attribute of plane figures, and distinguish between linear and area measures in geometric measurement.

Geometry 

  • Students will learn to reason with shapes and their attributes.

Students will learn through project-based activities and will learn to apply their knowledge understanding to real life situations through word problems and cross-curriculum activities.

Third grade social science revolves around central themes including: geography, culture and civic virtues, North American physical features, Black History Month, immigration, news reporting, women’s history, government, and natural resources. The Studies Weekly reading material is a main resource used to practice skills within nonfiction texts.

Throughout these units:

  • Students will learn how to analyze geographic information with maps.

  • Student will learn to utilize and incorporate map elements.

  • Students will learn to measure distance with map scales, and review continent and ocean names.

  • Students will learn to examine factors that contribute to settlement patterns in the United States of America, Canada, Mexico, and the Caribbean.

  • Students will learn to compare cultural characteristics and learn about distinct contributions made by Hispanic Americans and American Indians to American culture.

  • Students will learn to research various individuals who demonstrate civic virtues from Hispanic American and American Indian cultures.

  • Students will engage in activities that demonstrate civility, cooperation, and volunteerism.

  • Students will reflect upon the lives of important individuals and investigate various volunteer organizations.

  • Students will learn to analyze primary and secondary sources as they discuss the value of volunteering.

  • Students will learn how regions play a significant role in the development of tall tales.

  • Students will discover the differences between landmarks and landforms found in distant locations across the continent, as well as in Florida.

  • Students will learn about the lives and accomplishments of various influential African Americans.

  • Students will compare the differences between autobiographical and biographical accounts, as well as the logical order of ideas and events through various informational texts.

  • Students will experience a digital, interactive field trip to Ellis Island.

  • Students will learn to draw conclusions, make inferences, locate information, determine the main/central idea, analyze charts and maps, and paraphrase.

  • Students will learn to analyze primary and secondary sources.

  • Students will discover how good reporters utilize the “Five W” questions, and consider “point of view” when conducting thorough interviews.

  • Students will study citizens whose individual actions demonstrate civility, cooperation, volunteerism, and other civic virtues.

  • Students will learn the purpose and need for government.

  • Students will learn how our government was established through the history of the U.S. Constitution, including the Declaration of Independence, the Articles of Confederation, and the Bill of Rights.

  • Students will learn about the three branches and levels of government.

  • Students will take a field trip to the Palm Beach County Courthouse.

  • Students will learn to determine and describe the climate and vegetation of the various regions in the USA, Canada, Mexico, and Caribbean.

  • Students will learn to identify natural resources in these biomes and apply knowledge to a culminating end-of-year science project.

Third grade students will study three science domains over the course of the year: Life Science, Earth and Space Science, and Physical Science.

  • Students will learn to define a simple design problem that can be solved by applying scientific ideas about magnets.

  • Students will determine cause and effect relationships of electric or magnetic interactions between two objects.

  • Students will study life cycles, plant and animal traits, how animals’ habitats help them to survive, and environmental changes to habitats.

  • Students will study seasonal weather conditions, climates of different regions of the world, and the impact of weather-related hazards.

  • Students will learn about the effects of balanced and unbalanced forces on the motion of an object and analyze patterns to predict future motion.

  • Students will learn to determine and describe the climate and vegetation of the various regions in the USA, Canada, Mexico and Caribbean.

  • Students will learn to identify natural resources in these biomes and apply knowledge to a culminating end-of-year science project.

The Greene School Foreign Language program is intended to develop listening comprehension and verbal skills in young children with classes three times a week.  Skills in speaking, listening, reading, and writing are developed in this course. Students acquire language proficiency with visual and interactive support using grade level vocabulary and techniques such as Total Physical Response (TPR) and Natural Approach.  The goal of both of these strategies is to allow students to learn a second language in the same way they learned their first language – through their senses, encouraging long-term retention of the language. The approach to learning the language is naturally fundamental and repetitive as vocabulary is recycled to ensure mastery of the vocabulary words.

Third grade students use the ¡Qué chévere! and Realidades curriculum textbook which integrate development of language proficiency into cultural understanding using project-based learning activities, multimedia resources, songs, games, and stories.

  • Students will learn recalling, interpreting, and pronouncing the vocabulary appropriately.

  • Students will learn grade level subject pronouns, subject-verb agreement, adjectives, adverbs, affirmatives/negatives, people, verbs, clothes, school subjects, questions, possessive adjectives, objects/other nouns, places, sports/entertainment/music, foods, prepositions, time/days of the week, and weather.

  • Students will learn to answer questions on information using simple language about personal preferences, needs, and feelings.

  • Students will learn to use basic language skills supported by body language and gestures to express agreement and disagreement.

  • Students will learn to present personal information about one’s self by answering questions.

  • Students will learn to write simple sentences using the correct verbs and creativity.

  • Students will learn to use information acquired through the study of the practices and perspectives of the target culture(s) to identify some of their characteristics and compare them to the student’s own culture.

  • Students will learn to follow short and simple directions.

  • Students will learn to recite the numbers from 1-40 in the target language.

Fourth Grade - Core Curriculum

Our language arts curriculum utilizes a balanced approach to literacy including reading, writing, and vocabulary study. The emphasis of our ELA curriculum is for our thriving learners to engage deeply in the reading, speaking, and writing process.  Through a broad range of instructional protocols we take our students through learning experiences which weave student engagement, discourse, and collaboration.

Students will continue to build important reading, writing, speaking, and listening skills in grade four. They will read more challenging literature, articles, and other sources of information and continue to grow their vocabulary. They will also be expected to clearly explain in detail what they have read during collaborative discussions by referring to details or information from the text. They will learn how to take notes and organize information from books, articles, and online sources to learn more about a topic. Students will learn to organize their ideas and develop topics with reasons, facts, details, and other information. They will write research and opinion papers over extended periods of time.

Reading

Our approach to reading instruction enables children to build and hone skills they need to succeed in becoming independent readers. Explicit reading strategies are taught in a mini-lesson format, followed by both small group and individual instruction. We assess each child individually in order to determine his or her instructional reading level at various times throughout the year to provide continued differentiated instruction. Students interact with and explore a variety of genres through notable award-winning novels and teacher-selected informational paired text in a program called Reading Adventures.

  • Students learn to explore, identify, and reflect on themes, character development, problems/conflicts, and mood.

  • Students will learn to locate, evaluate, and interpret literary devices such as foreshadowing, flashbacks, imagery, characterization, repetition, connotations, epilogue, euphemisms, irony, and figurative language.

  • Students will build on prior knowledge and make rich connections to maximize their reading experience and enhance their comprehension.

  • Students work independently and in small groups to build stamina, discuss reading, and understand a variety of texts.

  • Students learn to interpret and analyze a range of written texts, both fiction and non-fiction.

  • Students learn to use explicit information to identify the main idea or primary purpose of a text or part of a text as well as explicit details from a passage to understand it fully.

  • Students learn how to use implicit information from a passage to make inferences about the moods and motivations of characters in order to understand their shifts and developments over the course of the book.

  • Students learn to make inferences about events, understanding their importance and meaning within the context of the book.

  • Students learn how to determine whether information consists of fact or opinion. Within fiction, they will learn whether or not a narrator is trustworthy.

  • Students recognize cause-and-effect relationships among elements in a text.

  • Students categorize and combine the layers of implicit information to make predictions, draw conclusions, and/or formulate hypotheses.

  • Students will employ comprehension strategies to interpret, analyze, and evaluate what they have read.

  • Students will be able to discuss texts well, demonstrating their understanding and growing each other’s ideas.

  • Students will engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, cooperative groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners to discuss topics and texts, building on others’ ideas and express their own ideas, positions, and responses.

  • Students will develop communication and public speaking skills in creation of group presentations using slides or IMovies.

  • Students will learn how to take notes and organize information from books, articles, and online sources to learn more about a topic.

Writing & Grammar

Our language arts instruction not only enhances the mechanics of writing, grammar, spelling, and syntax, but also allow students to express themselves in creative and personal ways. Through weekly growth mindset journaling, students respond to topics that encourage social and emotional growth, personal development, and innovative thinking.  Our focus is to create strong thinking through writing. Formal writing is done through a multidisciplinary approach weaving in social studies, science, and reading. It not only helps students make connections but enhances the learning experience.

  • Students will organize their ideas and develop topics with reasons, facts, details, and other information.

  • Students will write research and opinion papers over extended periods of time.

  • Students will learn to properly use conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.

  • Students will learn to properly use conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.

  • Students will learn to clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases based on reading and content, choosing flexibly from a range of strategies.

  • Students will learn proper use of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings.

Students will demonstrate skills through a variety of activities and products:

  • Board games

  • Pop-up books

  • Character journals

  • Scrapbooks

Students will participate in a variety of integrated writing activities utilizing multiple different writing formats:

  • Friendly letter

  • Poems

  • Role-play journals

  • App creations

  • Book reviews

  • R.A.F.T.

  • Formal essays such as informational, expository, and persuasive writing.

Monthly writing experiences allow our junior writers to publish and share their pieces with their peers.

The primary goal of our mathematics curriculum is to engage our students in activities that promote higher-level thinking, application of skills through problem-based learning activities, and rich mathematical discussions where they are thinking and speaking like a mathematician!

In order to maintain rigor, our curriculum provides flexible grouping with flexible pacing. Each topic is pre-tested to identify the various levels.  Students are pre-tested at the beginning of each topic to carefully identify student levels. Students passing material prior to formal instruction are accelerated using different grade-accelerated materials that included advanced content with a problem-solving focus.

Our mathematics instruction includes Operations, Algebra, Numbers, and Computation.

  • Students will learn place value through hundred millions

  • Students will learn decimal place values through hundred thousandths.

  • Students will learn to compare, estimate, and break apart numbers to solve inequalities.

  • Students will learn addition and subtraction of whole numbers and decimals and will apply this to multi-step problems.

  • Students will learn multiplication of multi-digit numbers by utilizing a variety of methods: area model of multiplication, distributive property, lattice method, and the traditional algorithm.

  • Students will learn long division.

  • Students will learn to use models and mathematical procedures to understand, recognize, and generate equivalent fractions.

  • Students will learn addition and subtraction of fractions, improper fractions, and mixed numbers.

  • Students will learn to identify the least common factor and greatest common denominator.

Students participate in various problem-based learning projects involving application of all operations, along with planning, organization, and real-life scenarios that develop and assess their math skills:

  • The Million Dollar Project

  • Movie Entrepreneur Project.

Fourth grade social studies instruction focuses mainly on Florida. Through the use of Studies Weekly and outside resources, students discover Florida’s rich history, geography, economics, and civics. The class incorporates printed material with web-based features to engage students in course content. Integrated into our social studies curriculum are important skills such as relevant writing prompts, word study, reading comprehension, critical thinking skills, and the opportunity to work both independently as well as in small groups.

Topics studied include:

  • Current events

  • Map skills review

  • Florida state symbols

  • Florida’s geography and how the climate affects the produce we grow and the plant and animal species that live in the state

  • Native American tribes that once inhabited this land – how they communicated, survived, and what their homes and clothing looked like

  • The first European explorers who discovered Florida – the objectives and goals of these men and how the discovery of Florida changed their lives

  • The colonization of Florida

  • The history of St. Augustine

  • Juan Ponce de Leon, Jean Ribault, and Pedro Menendez de Aviles and their contributions to the settlement as well as the conflict between the French and the Spanish

The study of Florida’s history is the forefront of fourth grade curriculum, however other topics are integrated into our lessons as well, including Black History Month and the Civil Rights Movement, Women’s History Month, Government Functions, Being a Citizen, and the American Revolution.

The main focus of our fourth grade science curriculum is in providing opportunities for students to engage in and understand science practices, explore issues related to engineering practices, as well as the use of natural resources. Students apply what they know as they complete hands-on activities, which helps strengthen current understanding and promotes new knowledge of the world around us. While actively participating in scientific investigations, students observe objects and events, think about how they relate to what is already known, test their ideas in logical ways, analyze outcomes, and generate explanations that describe what, why, and how a certain result occurred.

  • Students will learn skills that allow for successful inquiry and explanation.

  • Students will review the steps of the scientific method.

  • Students will design and carry out experiments that provide opportunities to make clear observations, infer and make connections with what is happening, as well as classify, measure, analyze and evaluate data.

  • Students will learn the importance of organizing information through the use of science notebooks where students document what they experience, any data they collect, and their thinking during the activity.

 Our science instruction is broken down into two main modules, Energy and Environments.

During our Energy module, students explore electricity, learn about circuits, discuss the advantages and disadvantages of each, and understand which materials conduct electricity. Students demonstrate their knowledge of these concepts through assessment and project-based learning opportunities, such as designing and constructing their own flashlight. A second topic introduced during this unit is magnetism and electromagnets. Through testing compasses, exploring the strength of magnetic attraction, creating visual magnetic fields, and building electromagnets and generators, students discover the phenomenon of magnets and interactions they have with materials and each other. Our final focus of this unit is energy transfer. Students observe and analyze data to determine how one form of energy can be transferred to another and document evidence seen that supports their ideas. Through well designed investigations, students discover what happens to energy when two objects collide, how variables affect one another, and use controlled experiments involving the transfer of potential energy into kinetic energy to test how mass and release position affect energy transfer.

The second module introduced in fourth grade is Environments. This module focuses on the way animals and plants interact with their environment and with each other. The driving question for the module deals with structure and function. Students design investigations to study environments, range of tolerance, and optimum conditions for growth and survival of specific organisms. Students conduct controlled experiments by incrementally changing specific environmental conditions and use data collected to develop and use models to understand the impact of changes to the environment. Students explore how animals use their sense of hearing and develop models for detecting and interpreting sound. They graph and interpret data from multiple experiments and develop explanations from evidence. Students gain experiences that will contribute to the understanding of patterns, cause and effect, system models, energy and matter, structure and function, and stability and change.

While participating in active investigations, online activities, outdoor experiences, and formative and benchmark assessments, students practice teamwork and interdependence, problem-solving skills, critical thinking, and applied understanding of past concepts to generate new hypotheses and conclusions. Our learning environment allows students to work and think like scientists and engineers.

The Greene School Foreign Language program is to expose students to ample listening and reading opportunities with classes four times a week.  Fourth grade Spanish curriculum integrates speaking, reading, writing, and listening, to help students achieve a level of proficiency. It is a gentle immersion to the language and culture as a whole. Students are encouraged to answer in Spanish with one word or sentences according to student’s level with approximately 90% of the class communication in Spanish.

Students acquire language proficiency with visual and interactive support using grade level vocabulary and techniques such as Total Physical Response (TPR) and Natural Approach.  The goal of both of these strategies is to allow students to learn a second language in the same way they learned their first language – through their senses, encouraging long-term retention of the language. The approach to learning the language is naturally fundamental and repetitive as vocabulary is recycled to ensure mastery of the vocabulary words.

Fourth grade students use the ¡Qué chévere! and Realidades curriculum textbook which integrate development of language proficiency into cultural understanding using project-based learning activities, multimedia resources, songs, games, and stories .

  • Students will learn: there is\there are, to be (ser), to be (estar), to go, to have, to want, to like.

  • Students will learn five more high frequency verbs: to say, to do, to give, to see, can.

  • Students will learn to answer question words (what, when, how, how many, who, why, how many).

  • Students will learn additional vocabulary: to listen, to understand, to practice, to answer, to remember, to think, to speak, to stand-up, to sit-down, to look, be able to, to say, to know, to do, to see, to give, to start, to finish, to close, to open, to write, to draw, to play, to walk, to run, to jump, to drink, to dance, to eat.

  • Students will understand (listen and read) these verbs and start conjugating them with all pronouns (I, you, he, she, we, they).

  • Students will learn vocabulary focusing on PQA and retelling stories.

  • Students will learn through topics: greetings, likes and dislikes, school, family, weather, sports, animals, physical descriptions, personality traits, and chores.

 Content is delivered using the following strategies:

  • Collaborative Storytelling

  • MovieTalk

  • Embedded Reading

  • PictureTalk

  • TPR (Total Physical Response)

  • Personalized Questions and Answers

  • Read and Discuss

 Technology is used to incorporate independent listening, speaking and reading. Technology is crucial in our Spanish class to differentiate instruction and to play games. Music, games, stories, and videos engage students on their learning journey.